Tencent

Tencent

Do you know what Tencent is?? If you don’t yet, you’re gonna. They’re coming to town.

Let me explain…

I’m not going to go down the politics rabbit hole here, but let’s just agree that thanks to our country’s current administration, foreign powers are relishing the opportunity to replace the United States as the leader of the world.

China is ecstatic.

China, like most of the eastern world, doesn’t think of time in the same sense as Americans: we focus on days, weeks, and months—China focuses on years, decades, and centuries; they play the long game, willing to sacrifice short-term losses in order to achieve long-term gains.

Tencent is no exception.

What exactly is Tencent?? It’s the world’s biggest investment corporation. It’s one of the largest internet and tech companies in the world. It is the largest and most valuable social media and gaming company in the world.

You see, there’s Apple, Alphabet (Google), Microsoft, and Amazon. And then there’s Tencent, which performs services and provides experiences akin to those four companies.

Instant messaging? Tencent QQ. Web portal? QQ.com. Mobile chat service? WeChat, credited as one of the world’s most powerful apps.

Tencent also owns the majority of China’s music services through its Tencent Music Entertainment division, with 700 million active users. That’s over double the number of people who live in the U.S. With 120 million paying subscribers, it’s also the world’s most profitable music service. (Tencent’s main music app, QQ Music, costs under two dollars a month compared to Spotify premium at ten bucks.)

If that wasn’t enough, Tencent recently performed a stock-swap with Spotify, wherein the companies each invested in the other for an undisclosed amount. Snap, the company behind Snapchat, also received an investment from Tencent to the tune of 12% of the company; Tencent believes Snapchat’s next move should be video game-related.

And I just read this morning that Tencent has now partnered with Lego, the second largest toy manufacturer in the world, to develop online games.

So, here we have an eastern company which is essentially a combination of Facebook, Google, Spotify, Microsoft, Apple, and Amazon, making moves that invest the company heavily in products and services being used in the western world, from music to video games to toys.

This is all to say that I’m a bit concerned.

Here in the U.S. there’s a debate raging over social media’s impact on our brains, moods, lifestyles, etc. No technology in history has been so broadly distributed while being so thoroughly dominated by a single company (Facebook), and we’re starting to learn about the detrimental effects.

So what happens when the largest tech company in China, a company that’s almost bigger than Facebook, Google, Amazon, and Apple COMBINED, decides to move in??

I don’t know. But I’m keeping my eye on it.

———
Visit the archive: https://therealjohnkay.wordpress.com

Join the fan club: Become a Bullfighter

Website: https://therealjohnkay.com
Music: Spotify Artist Page
Podcast: Get After It w/ John Kay on iTunes
Twitter: @TheRealJohnKay
Instagram: @therealjohnkay
Facebook: /TheRealJohnKay

Let he who would move the world first move himself. — Socrates

Copyright © 2018 John Kay, All rights reserved.

 

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Rock Fans, Say Goodbye to Rock and Roll (As You Know It)

Rock Fans, Say Goodbye to Rock and Roll (As You Know It)

Sorry to break it to you…

In July 2017, Nielsen Music reported that rock relinquished its place atop the music consumption pyramid for the first time since the company began tracking data in 1991.

Of course, rock was the far and away winner in physical album sales (42.7% of the industry’s total), but that’s the same as owning a mansion built on quicksand.

The truth is, listeners are flocking to playlists, where rock has lagged behind.

Streaming is saving the music industry, and rock’s share of audio on-demand streams (18.1%) was dwarfed by hip-hop and R&B (30.3%), allowing the latter genre to take a 2.1% lead in overall consumption.

I know. YOU love rock and roll, go to the shows, support the bands, buy the CDs and vinyl and merch, etc. You’ve always been a rock fan, and that will never change. I totally understand. All good.

But…

Just because Guns ‘N Roses, Metallica, the Red Hot Chili Peppers, and U2 ranked among 2017’s top global touring acts doesn’t mean that rock is still king…those bands are icons!

Plus, two of those acts are doing their version of greatest hits tours: G’N’R sold tons of tickets because Axl finally buried the hatchet with Slash and Duff, and U2 was a top-grossing act due to performing The Joshua Tree in full. That album is 30 years old! Granted, it’s an undeniable piece of work, but this was the first time ever that U2 toured in support of a back-catalogue release in their 40-year career.

“It’s not that rock’s popularity has necessarily waned, but it’s had growing pains as consumption shifted from an owned, album-based economy to an access- or tracks-based economy,” says Dylan Lewis, head of digital sales for Glassnote Records. “If [rock] mirrors the trajectory that hip-hop has had, we see this major growth opportunity. If hip-hop can do it, other genres can.”

…growing pains…

That reminds me of a transcript I read of an interview with Wes Borland, the face-painting breakout talent and guitarist of the ubiquitous late-1990s alternative band Limp Bizkit, who shared his take on the state of music industry and the dominance of streaming, telling Metal Sucks:

“I’m not a big supporter of Spotify. …I’m having a really hard time accepting just songs by themselves. …Of course, I’m a dinosaur and I’m 42…I’m gonna like records. …The record was made to be listened to as…one cohesive thought. Maybe not so much in the ’80s, but I kinda feel like we’re back in the ’80s in some way. People are just like ‘Single, single, single…’ My records are made with songs butt up against each other and have no change. …But on Spotify that doesn’t work…on Spotify you listen to one of my songs and it ends in a weird way because I refuse to write singles, I refuse to write in that format. I’m having trouble accepting Spotify and that way of listening. I’m set for extinction in the next however long. And teenagers don’t think that way, and neither do 20-somethings. They’re into streaming. Like any generation being overtaken by another generation, it’s hard to accept the way that they do things. And music for them has always been free. It’s just a devaluing of music.”

I’m having a really hard time accepting…I’m a dinosaur and I’m 42…I refuse to…I refuse to…I’m having trouble accepting…I’m set for extinction in the next however long…it’s hard to accept…’

First of all, a dinosaur at 42?? Leonard Cohen’s “You Want It Darker” is Grammy-nominated for Best Rock Performance this year, and it was released when he was 82!

Furthermore, Wes must only be considering the heyday of The Album in the 1960s and 1970s, because it’s always been a singles world, even since long before recorded music, when humans would sing around the piano in the parlor, or beat logs and grunt to the rhythm.

Great songs spread organically, and most great songs can be performed with one individual and an instrument (sometimes, the instrument isn’t even necessary)—songs are what people sing, not albums; the guy who plays an entire album on the jukebox is a jerk.

One thing you can count on, the younger generation will always defy the conventions of the older generation—Wes Borland, like many artists who experienced a high level of success early in their career, is complaining that his cheese has been moved.

Understand: the public is never wrong.

Tastes and preferences change with the times, always have, always will. So do great artists. If what you create isn’t resonating, there are reasons, and more often than not, most of the reasons have to do with the work itself. The aware artist seeks to root out those reasons and adapt accordingly, not place the blame on external circumstances or fluidity in taste or preferences.

And to that point, Austin Daboh, senior editor at Spotify UK, believes the current generation of artists are completely aware of what Spotify can do for them.

Daboh says, “Historically, artists…couldn’t just say, ‘Here’s a great song…can you play it please?’ More often than not the answer was no. So artists had to hustle.”

Hustle!

Hustle is not simply working hard and keeping your nose to the grindstone. More than that, it’s being aware of what’s happening on the streets, how it relates to and informs the collective cultural consciousness at large, and adapting and innovating within your chosen vocation’s industry based on your findings, changing the game from the inside out, all while retaining your authenticity.

So…if Wes Borland records an album and no one is around to stream it, does it make a sound?

He doesn’t seem to think so.

“I feel like the musician is gonna become like a trade of the past, like court jesters and coal miners, something that’s just not necessary anymore. I think people will do it as a hobby,” Borland concludes. “The whole musical middle class will be completely obliterated to where you’re either Rhianna or you’re one of the multitudes of any band trying to get time off your jobs so you can go play [big festivals]. And there’s gonna be no one to replace any of the headliners. Once Metallica is done, who’s gonna replace Metallica at European festivals? There’s no one. No band is big enough. …Bands nowadays into the past decade have not been able to have the opportunity to become legends. Because they don’t have the support, because music has been devalued.”

Is that the way it really is, though??

“…In the last year, I’ve noticed a change in artists gravitating towards Spotify, understanding their numbers,” Daboh continued. He believes Spotify gives, “a level of data that no other service gives, to let [artists] know how to better themselves on the service…[our] artist relations [department has] done an amazing outreach job…showing [artists] how this thing works.”

Amen! I’ve been in contact with artist relations at Spotify, and not only do they respond quickly, they are eager to help.

However, Daboh admits that Spotify still has work to do in this area. “There are [artists] we haven’t felt love from because they haven’t quite been educated about what Spotify can bring to their ecosystem. [But]…to the emerging ones making music in their bedrooms and garages…the message is coming across loud and clear that Spotify is here to support you and give you global levels of exposure. What we’re bringing to the game is a level of democracy, if your music is good and we believe there’s an audience for your record, we’re not scared to add you to our biggest playlist.”

The thing is, the future doesn’t care about old dead rock and roll legends. The great ones still get propped up out of respect because they once created something that spoke to the zeitgeist of the times and penetrated the mass consciousness.

But when their new stuff doesn’t cut the mustard, they either attempt to channel the vibrations of their past and make new music in the vein of their old catalogue, or they simply perform the old catalogue…

Because they are afraid of alienating or losing their old fans—their base—and they refuse to believe they can somehow adapt to the times and garner a newer or younger audience without sacrificing their authenticity.

Bottom line: They’re afraid of becoming irrelevant.

Kind of like that old-time rock and roll.

“We’re back to the ‘50s now, where the focus is on songs rather than albums,” Bono said in a recent Rolling Stone interview. “U2 make albums, so how do we survive? By making the songs better. And having, I hope, the humility to accept that we need to rediscover songwriting.”

Let’s face it, the rock and roll you have come to know, love, and live with for the past half century is dead—your music, and the way you prefer it to be distributed and consumed, is not at the top of the food chain any longer, and it’s time to accept it.

But somebody’s gonna bring rock into the future, by adapting, innovating, challenging norms.

And it’s gonna happen sooner than you think.

Hide and watch, kids.

P.S. Because it seems appropriate, click here to listen to my song “Say Goodbye 2 Rock and Roll”: https://open.spotify.com/track/485qXOrmjCejqoifQs1qTr

P.P.S. Guess what?? Wes Borland released a new album with his Big Dumb Face project on October 31. …You can stream it via Spotify.

Wes Borland: Professional Musician is Becoming a Trade of the Past, Soon People Will Only Do It as Hobby: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/news/general_music_news/wes_borland_professional_musician_is_becoming_a_trade_of_the_past_soon_people_will_only_do_it_as_hobby.html

For the first time ever, hip-hop is officially bigger than rock: http://www.nme.com/news/music/hip-hop-most-consumed-music-genre-bigger-than-rock-nielsen-2017-year-end-report-2205720

Austin Daboh on Spotify’s role in the UK rap scene: http://www.musicweek.com/digital/read/we-re-not-scared-to-add-artists-to-our-biggest-playlists-austin-daboh-on-spotify-s-role-in-the-uk-rap-scene/070839

After Losing Ground In the Streaming Era, Rock Charts Its Comeback: https://www.billboard.com/articles/business/8070586/rock-roll-streaming-music-business-comeback

———
Visit the archive: https://therealjohnkay.wordpress.com

Join the fan club: Become a Bullfighter

Website: https://therealjohnkay.com
Music: Spotify Artist Page
Podcast: Get After It w/ John Kay on iTunes
Twitter: @TheRealJohnKay
Instagram: @therealjohnkay
Facebook: /TheRealJohnKay

Let he who would move the world first move himself. — Socrates

Copyright © 2018 John Kay, All rights reserved.

Art is Going to Save Us: My First House Show Tour Recap

Art is Going to Save Us: My First House Show Tour Recap

Shared experiences; they are what life is really about.

I spent the past weekend with two of my band members performing house shows in Portland, Maine; Scranton, Pennsylvania; and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

The purpose of our short tour was to test the waters and see if this whole house show thing is something that people would enjoy, to find out whether performing a stripped-down, stories-behind-the-songs collection of my music would resonate the way my full productions do. (Spoiler alert: it did!)

But it was also to get back to a grassroots way of meeting people, making new friends, and connecting one-on-one with individuals.

The response was more than we could have asked for.

We learned quite a lot on our trip, and one of the things we learned is that people are yearning for a personal connection with their favorite artists.

In a time when the internet affords artists the opportunity to connect one-on-one with the fans of their work, we normally only hear from our favorite artists when they have something they want us to buy. And even then, that’s usually every two or three years when their new album comes out.

Albums. That’s another thing…

The album format has been exploded.

I recorded a podcast while in Portland at Gateway Mastering Studios with renowned mastering engineer Adam Ayan (Shakira, Luis Fonsi, Carrie Underwood, Queen, et al.), and he told me that he is mastering more singles and EPs than ever before, with albums sprinkled in here and there.

So, if you’re making an album, and you’re not being forced to do so because you’re signed to a record label, why are you doing it??

Unless you’re making an album of metal music—which studies show have the hands-down most loyal fanbase, a fanbase which still buys CDs and generally avoids streaming, clinging to the past—you’re swimming against the tide.

But I digress. Back to the matter at hand: connection.

In Portland, two of our Bullfighters (fan club members) are people who travel all over the country to see their favorite artists. They’ve been to countless shows and seen some of the most talented musicians perform in large and small venues. They told us they’d never experienced such an up-close-and-personal performance before, and they loved it.

The sentiment was shared by our new Portland friends, who took us out to dinner before the show. They enjoy treating bands (and their entire crew) to meals when they come through Portland, because they understand the struggle and the sacrifices being made to travel and get after a career in music. They, too, were blown away by the intimacy of the show, and said they had never been a part of something like that.

In Scranton, we visited with my good friend Phil, who is the program director at Alt 92.1 FM. He showed us around the station—which includes a 200-capacity theater with a 1932 Steinway grand piano. He said he is going to begin spinning my music on the radio, and will work with us to help put together an event when we return to the Scranton area.

And in Pittsburgh, as I was walking the streets, talking with locals and handing out flyers before our performance, I received many compliments and kudos on our “guerrilla marketing,” and that “your passion looks good on you; never stop doing what you’re doing.”

The people we connected with on this tour are incredibly supportive of our journey, and were kind enough to treat us to meals and allow us to stay the night in their homes.

We must have made a good impression, because they can’t wait for us to return so they can bring their family and friends and share the experience.

Which brings me to this article on the generosity of fans of music, and art in general:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/08/170803091933.htm

That’s right, folks. Art is going to save us!

But it’s not going to come from Taylor Swift, or Drake, or Bieber, or Luke Bryan, or Future, or Adele, or Max Martin, or Migos, or Shellback, or Dr. Luke, or Mark Ronson, or any of the other major players in today’s music game.

No, it’s going to come from THE PEOPLE, those fans of talented artists and the work they produce!

Need proof? Here it is, straight from Spotify…

John Stein, an editor focused on indie, alternative, and electronic music for some of Spotify’s biggest mood playlists explained to The Verge that there’s a difference between a live hit and a Spotify hit.

From The Verge article: “[Stein] likes to find out what songs people are singing along to in the real world. ‘That’s something we don’t see in the data,’ he says. ‘They’re not always the catchy ones. They’re surprises. And over time, people come back to those more.’ He says he likes music that has substance, which you ‘can’t fake,’ not just perfectly crafted pop songs with the chorus at the front. ‘You can’t build real fans by following such a formula in that way.’”

Amen.

Follow me on Spotify here: https://open.spotify.com/artist/7Lx9QDuqrvKCyr1jr1Q324

There is no art in a factory; not even in an art factory. — Eric “Mixerman” Sarafin

P.S. The researchers concluded that one implication of their findings for policy-makers is the potential for “substantial social and economic gains” from investing in the arts. They argue that these may be achieved “effectively by policies or investments that make the arts more widely available and ensure that access is not restricted only to the wealthy.” … Arts Council England’s Director of Communication and Public Policy, Mags Patten, said: “This paper makes a significant contribution to growing evidence of a causal link between taking part in the arts, individual wellbeing, and the strength of communities. This valuable piece of research will be important reading for those already studying in this vital area, and it should encourage new studies of the social impact of the arts.”

P.P.S. Become a Bullfighter today, and my band and I will perform in your area within a calendar year of your enrollment, guaranteed, or your money back. 😀

———
Visit the archive: https://therealjohnkay.wordpress.com

Join the fan club: Become a Bullfighter

Website: https://therealjohnkay.com
Music: Spotify Artist Page
Podcast: Get After It w/ John Kay on iTunes
Twitter: @TheRealJohnKay
Instagram: @therealjohnkay
Facebook: /TheRealJohnKay

Let he who would move the world first move himself. — Socrates

Copyright © 2018 John Kay, All rights reserved.

Sturgill Simpson Busking at the CMAs

Sturgill Simpson Busking at the CMAs

I have a love/hate relationship with country music…

On the day I was born, my father was hired to work as a DJ at WWWW 106.7 FM in downtown Detroit.

He missed Howard Stern by a week, after Stern left when the station switched formats to country.

“W4 Country,” as the station was known, kept a roof over my family’s heads and put food on our plates for 14 years.

Willie Nelson held me in his arms as a toddler. In fact, so did the members of Alabama and the Oak Ridge Boys, along with Ronnie Milsap, Eddie Rabbit, Roger Miller, George Strait, and countless other country stars of the early-to-mid-1980s and prior.

Accompanying my dad to all of the big gigs he’d work for the station, getting to meet so many amazing musicians and watching them perform night after night, seeing the audience’s reaction to the music and the production, and feeling the energy and the love in the arena…

These are the things that made me want to become a musician. And country music winds its way into many of my songs to this day.

Today’s country music just isn’t the same.

I can’t say that it’s bad, because music is like wine — if you like it, it’s good; and a lot of people like mainstream country music.

But I hate it.

Because mainstream country music, and Nashville itself, has been co-opted by Big Music and the pop machine. Hell, even Willie stopped recording in Nashville. He’s been making his more recent stuff down in Austin, Texas.

Many of today’s most popular country songs are being manufactured in “hit factories” in the same fashion as pop songs are, trying to make earworms.

But Chris Stapleton is the one winning the awards, by being authentic and doing things his way. (He took home this year’s CMAs for Male Vocalist of the Year and Album of the Year.)

And then you’ve got Sturgill Simpson, whose busking outside the CMAs prompted me to write this missive.

My future brother-in-law tried to turn me on to Simpson two years ago. It didn’t take. To be honest, most of the time, when people suggest music to me, I am reluctant to listen or check it out.

It’s not because I’m not interested, it’s because I don’t have time!

Between work and family, I don’t have any time alone to sit by myself and soak in new music, the way I did when I was still in school. If and when I discover new music, it’s because I intentionally make time to listen to Spotify in the studio as I write or do something else.

That’s another thing! Music has become background noise, instead of the medium which drives the culture and informs the public consciousness.

Which is why Sturgill Simpson busking outside the CMAs resonated with me…

Much like Chris Stapleton, Simpson doesn’t really fit with the country mainstream, and the CMAs are all about the mainstream, which is why Simpson was on the outside looking in.

But that’s not an issue for him.

He won this year’s Grammy for Best Country Album, and his Grammy was sitting in his guitar case as he performed on the sidewalk, answering questions as they came in from fans on Facebook Live, and any donations he received went to the ACLU; that’s the American Civil Liberties Union, for those who don’t know.

And after playing songs and waxing on his appreciation of Kanye West and bluegrass music, he was asked to give a would-be speech if he won a CMA.

Here’s what he said…

“Nobody needs a machine gun, coming from a guy who owns quite a few guns. Gay people should have the right to be happy and live their life any way they want to and get married if they want to without fear of getting drug down the road behind a pickup truck. Black people are probably tired of getting shot in the streets and being enslaved by the industrial prison complex. And hegemony and fascism is alive and well in Nashville, Tennessee.

“Thank you very much.”

Artists are supposed to speak truth to power, and that’s what Sturgill Simpson did, albeit outside the CMAs.

Before they became personal brands with fragrance and cosmetics deals, or their own clothing line, artists used their work to awaken consciousness in others, helping to shape and inform public opinion in a positive direction. Hip-hop has been doing this for decades.

And hip-hop dominates today, but the most popular song on the most popular streaming service (Spotify) is Post Malone’s “rockstar” which begins with the line “I’ve been fuckin’ hoes and poppin’ pillies” and continues with “fuckin’ with me, call up on a Uzi” — it has almost 2 million daily plays in the U.S. and over 5.3 million daily plays worldwide.

Do you sometimes wonder why we have a nationwide opioid epidemic and a rampant gun problem?? Yes, Big Pharma and the NRA are the major drivers, but when the most popular music in the United States (and the world) is glorifying getting high on pills and shooting up rivals, it doesn’t help.

At any rate, my point is this…

Instead of taking the easy route and using the formula that mainstream artists use, and/or pandering to the lowest common denominator, artists such as Sturgill Simpson and Chris Stapleton create music that speaks to our better nature as humans.

And when they sing their songs, one can hear in their voices the pain, the heartache, the courage, the hope, the love about which they sing, because it comes from deep within themselves, from their experiences in life.

My music comes from that same place: of me and by me.

And I can’t wait to perform it for you. 🙂

11/16 Portland, ME — 8 Arundel Road, Kennebunkport 04046
11/17 Scranton, PA — currently finalizing booking
11/18 Pittsburgh, PA — 1111 Woodland Avenue, Pittsburgh 15212

Tickets for these intimate, stories-behind-the-songs house shows are only $10 and will be available at the door.

Doors will open at 8pm, and shows will start at 9pm, or once tickets are sold out. Once again, only 30 tickets will be available for each performance, so plan to arrive early!

P.S. Every Bullfighter — fan club member — gets two tickets per year to see me when I come to town, so they never have to worry about a show selling out!

P.P.S. Below is a comprehensive list of Bullfighter cities across the United States. Don’t see your city or state listed? Become a Bullfighter today and we’ll be performing there soon! 😀

  • Montgomery, AL
  • Tucson, AZ
  • Gilbert, AZ
  • Pasadena, CA
  • San Francisco, CA
  • Denver, CO
  • Fort Collins, CO
  • Bell, FL
  • Kissimmee, FL
  • Chicago, IL
  • Louisville, KY
  • Boston, MA
  • Portland, ME
  • Detroit, MI
  • Grand Rapids, MI
  • Pittsburgh, PA
  • Houston, TX
  • San Antonio, TX
  • Tacoma, WA
  • Beckley, WV
  • Huntington, WV

———
Visit the archive: https://therealjohnkay.wordpress.com

Join the fan club: Become a Bullfighter

Website: https://therealjohnkay.com
Music: Spotify Artist Page
Podcast: Get After It w/ John Kay on iTunes
Twitter: @TheRealJohnKay
Instagram: @therealjohnkay
Facebook: /TheRealJohnKay

Let he who would move the world first move himself. — Socrates

Copyright © 2018 John Kay, All rights reserved.

I’m a Believer

I’m a Believer

“I think that the thing that major labels have always done that is important in the business is provide highly sophisticated, robust, well-developed processes for artists to reach their highest potential,” VP of New Digital Business at Universal Music Group, Tuhin Roy said.

“At the end of the day, that’s why artists come to us, because they believe we’re going to help them reach their highest potential.”

One more time…

‘…because they believe we’re going to help them reach their highest potential.’

BELIEF.

It’s what drives all working artists, the belief that someday, somehow, their dreams will come true, their creations will break into the mainstream consciousness, and their years and years of hard work and commitment will pay off in the end.

And the major record labels have preyed on that precious belief and exploited it to the benefit of their own bank accounts for decades.

Major labels know that artists are willing to do almost anything to reach their goals and live out their dreams, and so they are able to tilt contracts heavily in favor of the label, the artist becoming a sort of indentured servant.

Since many artists are desperate and/or uninformed, they willingly sign a lopsided contract, hoping that their success will solve everything in the end.

The chances of that are next to nil.

And once the contract is signed, the artist is legally obligated to produce music at the label’s discretion, for the duration of the contract. The artist must now make music of the label, by the label, and for the label.

In fact, artists on major record labels today tend to not write their own music. They have their songs crafted at writers’ camps, which author John Seabrook says in his book The Song Machine are “like a pop-up hit factory.”

Record labels and big-time artists put these camps together, and they can last up to two weeks, but usually less than a week. A few dozen beat- and track-makers and melody-makers (“topliners”) get mixed and matched in every way possible until all combinations have been exhausted.

And if the artist happens to be present, they are floating from combo to combo, checking out what each team has going on, working on ideas here and there, keeping and discarding what they like or don’t like. This is how the artist gets credit if and when the song is released — “change a word, get a third” is a well-known phrase in the business.

From The Song Machine: “The peer pressure is such that virtually every session produces a song, which means twelve or more songs a day, or sixty a week, depending on the size of the camp.”

This is all to say that the major record labels wield a great deal of power over their artists, and often end up controlling their entire careers, to the point where an artist no longer produces their own work from a place of authenticity, but instead defers to data, polls, and metrics while choosing a potential earworm from a smorgasbord of songs whipped up in haste by committee.

But things are shifting in a new direction…

People used to complain about streaming services. Now, they appear to be saving the music industry…

Artists are foregoing record labels and securing their own publishing, licensing, and distribution…

And they are growing their fan bases organically, through grassroots campaigns and tours, and connecting via social media and email…

Today it costs virtually nothing to distribute music on the internet, worldwide, or to connect with fans directly…

So why would an artist need a label???

Answer: Relationships and capital.

That’s what the majors offer — they are people who know people who know people who know people, and all of these people have deep pockets, in a world where many artists can’t even afford to buy new pants.

But are those the relationships that artists truly need? Or should artists be more concerned about their relationship with the fans of their music??

And should artists be focused on money first? Always worrying about the bottom line? Or should the artist be serving the Muse, allowing the Muse to flow through them, transmuting its whispers into their art, critics be damned??

The internet has granted artists and fans the opportunity to take the power back from the suits, and show the world that great music matters more than “hits.”

And now Tuhin Roy is hoping to find the next big thing in music…before it’s too late…

From Mashable (10/17): “Universal…announced the launch of its accelerator network in an effort to encourage the emergence of music startups— with the goal of getting Universal in on the ground floor of the next big thing.

“The deal puts Universal at the earliest stage possible with entrepreneurs looking for help in trying something new. The label is working with accelerators at that application process, then lending expertise and mentorship to founders with music-focused startups.

“Justin Hendrix, executive director of NYC Media Lab, said that corporate partners are important for entrepreneurs who might not otherwise have those relationships.

“The goal is to encourage more entrepreneurs and accelerators to focus their energy on music, which can be a daunting and byzantine industry to deal with.

“Universal isn’t taking equity for its efforts, which is the usual deal between startups and acceleartors. Roy said the label sees value in hearing about new ideas from entrepreneurs and having the chance to work with startups from early days.

“‘There’s a reverse learning process for us. We actually learn as we engage in these startups how they view the business which is maybe a view for where things are heading,’ Roy said.”

The labels are starting to see the writing on the wall. They are learning that in order to reach their highest potential, artists don’t necessarily need a major record label anymore.

Sony Music CEO Rob Stringer on 11/03: “I have huge admiration for everything Spotify has done to build their business. We have a complicated relationship with it now because we have to make sure that we’re represented properly and they don’t bypass us. There’s a temptation there, if they’re valued at what they’re supposed to be valued at, they could become larger than all the labels put together. It is my job to maintain the balance. We don’t control distribution and we are therefore not as much in control of our destinies as we were during the boom of CDs, of the explosion of vinyl in the ‘60s.”

Thanks to the internet, artists just need to make great art and connect with the people who love it.

For me, those people are the Bullfighters. The Bullfighters are the members of my fan club, and my band and I only perform in areas within 50 miles of each Bullfighter.

Because the Bullfighters believe in me.

On that note…

I’m excited to announce I’m getting back on the road, and will begin performing my music next week!

Me and two of my band members are hitting the highway to perform a stripped-down, stories-behind-the-songs collection of my music, and we can’t wait to connect with old friends and make new ones.

These will be intimate house shows, taking place in a spacious living room, on a backyard patio, or in a basement or garage; basically, somewhere that will comfortably accommodate 25-30 adults.

Tickets are only $10 and will be available exclusively at the door. There will only be 30 tickets available for each performance, so plan to arrive as early as possible! Doors will open at 8pm, and shows will start at 9pm, or once tickets are sold out.

  • 11/16: Portland, ME (8 Arundel Road, Kennebunkport, ME 04046)
  • 11/17: Scranton, PA (currently finalizing booking)
  • 11/18: Pittsburgh, PA (1111 Woodland Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15212)

I can’t wait to play my music for you, and connect with old and new friends. See you out there on the road! 😀

P.S. Every Bullfighter get two tickets per year to see me when I come to town, so they never have to worry about a show selling out!

P.P.S. Below is a comprehensive list of Bullfighter cities across the United States. Don’t see your city or state listed? Become a Bullfighter today and we’ll be performing there soon! 🙂

  • Montgomery, AL
  • Tucson, AZ
  • Gilbert, AZ
  • Pasadena, CA
  • San Francisco, CA
  • Denver, CO
  • Fort Collins, CO
  • Bell, FL
  • Kissimmee, FL
  • Chicago, IL
  • Louisville, KY
  • Boston, MA
  • Portland, ME
  • Detroit, MI
  • Grand Rapids, MI
  • Pittsburgh, PA
  • Houston, TX
  • San Antonio, TX
  • Tacoma, WA
  • Beckley, WV
  • Huntington, WV

———
Visit the archive: https://therealjohnkay.wordpress.com

Join the fan club: Become a Bullfighter

Website: https://therealjohnkay.com
Music: Spotify Artist Page
Podcast: Get After It w/ John Kay on iTunes
Twitter: @TheRealJohnKay
Instagram: @therealjohnkay
Facebook: /TheRealJohnKay

Let he who would move the world first move himself. — Socrates

Copyright © 2018 John Kay, All rights reserved.

A Gun is a Guarantee

A Gun is a Guarantee

I received this in an email from a fan in Finland regarding a Facebook post I made yesterday…

“You really nailed it in ‘Don’t mess w my routine‘. I have been following the shootings and others acts of terror recently. It all makes me very sad.

“Was thinking of commenting on your post about gun control, but didn’t. It seems to be a very polarized discussion and the other side is unreachable, like the character in your song. Seems the whole debate is off the rails. I have some experience of guns, hunting and the army. I only just realized (reading about the recent killings) what kind of guns you actually have easily available in your country. It is very disturbing. Like the one used in the latest shooting. Seriously, that kind of gun should absolutely not be used in any other case than military training or war. It’s quite similar to the ones we had when I was in the army. No way anyone could have one at home over here. I just don’t understand how it all got so messed up in the US. NRA and its supporters must have a lot of power.

“Well, it is good that a lot of people, like yourself, still have the courage to take the debate for gun control. Sure hope the course can be changed, and if the shootings continue at this rate it should have some effect too one would expect.”

My fine Finnish friend doesn’t realize how much Americans LOVE guarantees!

Most products sold in the United States come with a guarantee, and if one doesn’t, you can probably buy a guarantee for it in the form of an extended warranty.

TV goes out the night before the Big Game?? No worries! You got a four-year replacement warranty when you bought the TV and can exchange it at the store for a brand new one!

Car was involved in an accident?? No worries! Just pay your deductible, and your insurance company will cover the costs for repair or replacement, and they’ll even pay for a rental vehicle in the meantime!

Someone broke into your house?? No worries! You have a gun!

Americans worry a lot, and guarantees help us worry a little less, sleep a little better at night. Sleeping well is important.

For many people, having that gun — or several guns — at the ready helps them sleep better at night. They feel safe and secure knowing that they can protect themselves and their family from a dangerous threat. They are guaranteed to have a shot(!) at ending whatever situation walks through that door.

Other people are fascinated by guns, which they respect and honor as collectors’ items, whether rare pieces from history or simply many different types of firearms for variety’s sake.

But at the core of it all, guns are deadly weapons, and we are seeing time and time again in America that a considerable number of gun owners are irresponsible with their deadly weapons. Many owners of firearms even have histories of violence or require mental health treatment.

These people, who probably shouldn’t be allowed to own a gun in the first place, aren’t getting the attention they deserve until it’s too late, for them and the victims of their insanity.

I can’t say this enough…we live in an attention economy.

These men aren’t getting enough attention, and they know what to do which guarantees it, however fleeting and no matter the cost to anyone. It’s all about THEM. The excuses are just that, excuses.

It’s far easier to blame the Other than it is to shout “I don’t feel as though I’ll ever live up to my dad’s expectations!” or “The boys made fun of me in school too much!” or “I was supposed to play in the pros!” or “I should still be an army/air force/marine/navy man!” or “My brain hurts from all of the warring I did and the government isn’t helping me like they promised!” or “My wife/girlfriend cheated on me or left me!” or WHATEVER reasons these abnormal cusses have for delivering the despicable to America’s doorstep.

Plus, we can’t forget that even after millions of years of evolution, we still walk around with hunter-gatherer brains inside our skulls. There is programming at work in our subconscious from eons ago about which we are still learning.

That said, there are numerous resources available both online and offline to learn and study about the human mind, our natural tendencies, and what influences us.

Adam Smith said “The first thing you have to know is yourself. A man who knows himself can step outside himself and watch his own reactions like an observer.”

Until men own their inherent Man Baggage (no, not their genitals [or, just maybe, their genitals??]), cease to allow it to control their lives, stop being afraid of it, come to terms with it, accept it, learn from it, and grow out of it…we are going to see more and more violence.

Because in an attention economy, using a gun is a guarantee.

The world is watching us. What do we do now??

———
Visit the archive: https://therealjohnkay.wordpress.com

Join the fan club: Become a Bullfighter

Website: https://therealjohnkay.com
Music: Spotify Artist Page
Podcast: Get After It w/ John Kay on iTunes
Twitter: @TheRealJohnKay
Instagram: @therealjohnkay
Facebook: /TheRealJohnKay

Let he who would move the world first move himself. — Socrates

Copyright © 2018 John Kay, All rights reserved.

Ahead of the Curve: Life After Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Snapchat

Ahead of the Curve: Life After Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Snapchat

Driving for Uber and Lyft, I pick up many people from different walks of life and who work in all kinds of industries. Many times, we have illuminating and educational conversations.

One of my recent riders was a 21-year-old University of Michigan grad student I picked up from the airport. He had just returned from living in San Francisco, where he worked for three months as an intern.

San Francisco is the United States’ tech hub, so when I inquired as to which company he interned for, I was not shocked to hear that it was Facebook and Instagram.

I asked him “So, what’s on the horizon? What’s next? What’s coming that we don’t know about?”

“Do you use Instagram?” he asked.

“Yessir.”

“Have you seen our stories feature?”

“Absolutely,” I replied. “It seems as though you are trying to compete directly with Snapchat.”

“Yes, that’s the case.” He continued, “We are trying to get more low-quality users back on the Instagram platform.”

He essentially said that professional photographers and brands with good photography have taken over Instagram. Users that would not normally take the time to filter and edit their photos, set up lighting, etc., either don’t have the time, don’t know how to do it properly, or don’t care to do it, and therefore don’t want to compete with the professional work that’s on Instagram now, which garner so many views and likes and comments.

In addition, Instagram has become such a powerful way for a brand to promote itself that it’s become an advertiser’s playground — just like Facebook (the 21-year-old admitted as much).

He revealed that the endgame is acquiring more users to the Instagram platform who feel comfortable sharing their “low-quality moments” throughout the day, but then maybe having one photo here or there that they make look more professional and highlight.

Instagram wants the “low-quality users” back that Snapchat took once Instagram became a photographer’s and brand’s paradise.

They want people who have fun and care more about the entertainment factor to get back on their platform and share their pics so that they can attract more advertisers, because advertising dollars drive Facebook and Instagram, and so many people have migrated to Snapchat because of it.

But in my view, the issue is much simpler: where older people go, younger people don’t want to be.

Facebook took off and gained traction in the mid-aughts because younger people were using it to connect with each other. Once they had Nana and Papa in their Facebook feeds, they migrated to Twitter. When Twitter became populated with a bunch of older people, they migrated over to the next thing, Instagram, and then once again, rinse and repeat, they went from Instagram to Snapchat.

And now older people are figuring out Snapchat, which means something new is on the rise.

And I don’t know what it is but I’m damn sure going to find out.

Because in today’s day and age, if you’re not at least one step ahead of the curve…

You’re already far behind.

———
Visit the archive: https://therealjohnkay.wordpress.com

Join the fan club: Become a Bullfighter

Website: https://therealjohnkay.com
Music: Spotify Artist Page
Podcast: Get After It w/ John Kay on iTunes
Twitter: @TheRealJohnKay
Instagram: @therealjohnkay
Facebook: /TheRealJohnKay

Let he who would move the world first move himself. — Socrates

Copyright © 2018 John Kay, All rights reserved.